Monday, January 15, 2018

Sketching with Patches of Tone

In this graphite pencil sketch, Charles Bargue (1825–83) uses well placed patches of tone rather than using only outlines to describe the form.

Charles Bargue, graphite, 8 x 5 3/16 inches, Metropolitan Museum
The patches are made out of short, parallel strokes, which create an impressionistic, painterly effect, even though he's working only in unblended pencil.

Charles Bargue helped create the Drawing Course used in many ateliers.
The method of sketching with patches of tonal values is also described in Sketching - from Square One to Trafalgar Square and Ernest Watson's The Art of Pencil Drawing.

Previous post: The El Dorado Page (Ernest Watson)

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Dan Gurney, 1931-2018


Very sad to know that race driver, car builder, team owner (and my cousin) Dan Gurney died today from complications of pneumonia. I'll miss his courage, tenacity, kindness, and humor.

African Warrior Fantasy


Imaro II: The Quest for Cush is a fantasy novel written by Charles Saunders, an expert in African folklore. I wanted Imaro to be a convincing warrior hero, so I located a tall, built model named Darrell, who was in training to play for the L.A. Lakers. That’s Mount Kenya in the distance.
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Saturday, January 13, 2018

Hobey Ford's Rod Puppets

In this video, master puppeteer Hobey Ford of North Carolina shows how he uses foam and wire to create lifelike movement. (Link to video)

Hobey Ford and his puppets. Image from Focus Newspapers



Thanks, Linda Crank.

Friday, January 12, 2018

New Book on Edwin Georgi

A young woman is startled by a sound while raiding a jewelry box.


The artist is Edwin Georgi (1896-1964), the subject of the latest monograph on an American illustrator by The Illustrated Press.


Georgi was a pilot in WWI, but was shot down and injured. While recovering, he took up an interest in art. Mostly self-taught, he began his career doing paste-ups in an advertising agency. His early illustrations were muted and restrained.


His earliest illustrations were for advertising clients, portraying exotic women in elegant settings. As time went by his approach to color became more daring.


He is best known for a shimmering, golden backlighting, painted in a pointillist style. He often accentuated color effects by placing strong warm and cool accents near each other.

He was a bold experimenter with lighting ideas, and he painted in many media, including colored ink, watercolor, gouache, and oil. 

The book starts with a short bio, but the bulk of the pages are devoted to large reproductions of originals and tearsheets. 


The book is loaded with art, and includes a lot of preliminary studies rendered in pencil, ink, and gouache, sometimes with the art director's comments written in the margins. Many of the sketches are paired with the finished work, so you can study how the pictures developed.


The Art of Edwin Georgi is hardback 224 pages, 9" x 12" full color. The standard edition is $44.95, and there's also a collectable slipcased edition of 100.

Previous books in this series by The Illustrated Press are each limited to 1000 copies include Tom Lovell—Illustrator and The Art of Jon Whitcomb

Art Blogs Award 2017
If you like this blog, please nominate it and vote for me.


Thursday, January 11, 2018

The Frozen Hudson

The Hudson River was a sea of jagged ice yesterday.



(Link to video on Facebook) The temperature climbed briefly above freezing, allowing me to paint in gouache. I used a sketchbook page with a light blue-gray priming color in casein that I did the day before.

The underpainting color came close to the color of the snow layer on the ice. Where the chunks had an icy, specular surface, it picked up more of the golden light of the sky.



We're 100 miles north of New York City, and the river is tidal here. The vertical movement of the surface shatters the 12-inch-thick layer of ice along the shoreline, making it a jumble of angular shapes.

Check out my gouache board on Pinterest